It’s all about the dressing

Summer salads are a great way to explore what’s in season while introducing your little one to new flavors. Dips, dressings, that little something extra is what makes a difference from the little one turning his or her nose up to diving right in. Dressing doesn’t need to come in a bottle. It’s something you can make at home with your little ones. Get them involved. See which flavor they like. Then, try mixing the dressings with produce. What do you like with the raspberry vinaigrette? Is there something that the balsamic is better with? (Try strawberries, feta and spinach with the last one. It’s a simple, warm weather healthy addition to any meal.)

Today, it’s all about the dressings. Maybe you end up with a variety of them in your home to meet individual tastes. That’s OK!! These are homemade and fresh. Each recipe makes enough to dress salad for four. If you find one that everyone likes, consider doubling or tripling the recipes and storing it in a mustard or jam jar. Before to shake before serving. These dressings should stay fresh for a week.

Citrus vinaigrette

  1. In a saucepan, simmer ½ cup of orange juice, ¼ cup lime juice and 2 Tbsp. lemon juice for 4 minutes or until 1/3 cup remains. Pour into a bowl.
  2. Whisk 1 Tbsp. white balsamic vinegar, minced red chile, a large minced shallot, chopped mint, ½ tsp. each grated orange and lemon zests, 1 tsp. Dijon mustard, kosher salt and black pepper.
  3. Whisking continuously, slowly add ¼ cut extra-virgin olive oil until emulsified.

 

Balsamic vinaigrette

  1. Whisk together 3 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar (white or dark), 1 ½ Tbsp. warm water, 1 tsp. Dijon mustard and ½ tsp. of each minced garlic, kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper.
  2. Whisking continuously, slowly pour in 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil until emulsified.

 

Mustard-herb vinaigrette

  1. In a blender, puree 1 hard-cooked egg yolk (this makes the dressing extra creamy, 3 Tbsp. white wine vinegar, 1 Tbsp. each grainy Dijon mustard and water, and ½ tsp. each of minced garlic, kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper.
  2. With blender running, slowly add 5 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil until emulsified. Pour into a bowl; stir in 2 tsp. chopped fresh tarragon, chervil, basil or parsley.

 

Fresh raspberry vinaigrette

  1. In a blender, puree ¾ cup fresh raspberries with ¼ cup reduced sodium chicken broth.
  2. Scrape puree through a fine-mesh sieve into a medium bowl and discard seeds.
  3. Into the puree, whisk 2 Tbsp. canola oil, 1 Tbsp. each of apple cider vinegar and minced shallot, 2 tsp. Dijon honey mustard and ¼ tsp. each of kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper until emulsified.

 

Sesame-ginger vinaigrette

  1. Whisk together 2 tsp. grated fresh ginger, 1 tsp. each of minced garlic and sugar, and 2 Tbsp. each of rice vinegar and soy sauce.
  2. While whisking, slowly add ¼ cut peanut or canola oil and 1 Tbsp. toasted Asian sesame oil until emulsified. Stir in 1 Tbsp. snipped fresh chives and 1 tsp. toasted sesame seeds.

 

Chipotle-honey-lime vinaigrette

  1. In a medium bowl, whisk 3 Tbsp. lime juice, 1 minced chipotle chile in adobo sauce, 1 ¼ tsp. each or honey and ground cumin, and ½ tsp. each of minced garlic and kosher salt.
  2. Whisking continuously, slowly add 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil until emulsified. Stir in 1 Tbsp. chopped cilantro.

Ice cream waffle sandwiches

You know when you pass by an ice cream shop, there is an intoxicatingly delicious smell that gets you, right? It’s not like ice cream has a scent that travels. It’s the waffle cone – fresh pressed waffle cone – that makes you take an extra second. A big deep sniff in and then you smile; that smell means tasty relief from the warm weather that’s just starting to descend on us now? (I guess that depends on where you live but the Bay Area is on a definite warming streak.)

That’s the kind of thing that makes you think about ice cold ice cream and tasty waffle cones. You know, the fun of trying to eat it fast enough that it doesn’t melt, creating a sticky mess on your hands, but not too fast as to create a headache. It’s a tough world out there. These are the real problems.

One delicious solution is the ice cream sandwich. Have you ever considered making your own waffle to go with the frozen treat? That’s what we’re doing this week. Thanks to a craft from ComeTogetherKids.com, we’re making cake and ice cream sandwiches. It’s a simple concept: Take chocolate cake mix – from the box or the scratch recipe below – and use it to make waffles in a waffle maker. Let the waffles cool the spoon vanilla ice cream on one side. Add a second waffle and enjoy. It’s that simple.

You’ll Need

1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup superfine sugar
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/3 cup best-quality cocoa
1 1/2 sticks soft unsalted butter
2 large eggs
2 tsp. good-quality vanilla extract
2/3 cup sour cream

Here’s How

Take everything out of the refrigerator so that all ingredients can be room temperature.

Preheat the waffle iron.

Put all the cake ingredients: flour, sugar, baking powder and soda, cocoa, butter, eggs, vanilla and sour cream into a food processor and process until you have a smooth, thick batter. If you want to go the long way around, just mix the flour, sugar and leavening agents in a large bowl and beat in the soft butter until you have a combined and creamy mixture. Now whisk together the cocoa, sour cream, vanilla, and eggs and beat this into your bowl of mixture.

Once you have the mixture, use it the way you would a waffle batter. Pour it into the waffle maker and follow the cooking instructions for your personal machine.

Allow the chocolate waffles to cool. Once cold, take a couple spoonfuls of ice cream – your choice in terms of flavor – and spread it on one waffle. Once you have enough, place another chocolate waffle on top. Then, enjoy!

Veggie hide-and-seek

Are your little ones eating enough veggies? They probably aren’t specifically asking for extra peas and carrots. That could change by hiding them.

Investigators at Columbia University recently gave this a go. They enlisted 68 elementary and middle school children and gave them two samples to try. One was labeled broccoli gingerbread spice cake and the other simply gingerbread spice cake. The kids didn’t know the cake was the same but they loved the gingerbread spice cake that didn’t have broccoli in the name.

While children were more likely to eat products that didn’t have veggies listed on the label, doctors did encourage parents to introduce their children to a variety of vegetables to find one they like. Then the hiding won’t be necessary.

Let’s give it a try with sweet potato cupcakes with toasted marshmallow frosting. Thanks to Better Homes and Gardens and Lovin’ From the Oven for the recipes, respectively.

Ingredients
For the cupcakes
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 tsp. baking powder
½ tsp. baking soda
¼ tsp. salt
1 tsp. ground cinnamon
16 Tbsp. unsalted butter, softened
1½ cups sugar
3 large eggs
17 oz. sweet potato puree
½ tsp. vanilla extract

For the frosting
8 large egg whites
2 cups sugar
½ tsp. cream of tartar
2 tsp. vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line two cupcake pans with paper liners. In a medium bowl combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon; stir together with a fork and set aside.
  2. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream together the butter and sugar on medium-high speed until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Beat in the eggs one at a time, scraping down the bowl after each addition. Mix in the sweet potatoes and vanilla extract, beating just until combined. Reduce the mixer speed to low and add the dry ingredients, mixing just until incorporated.
  3. Divide the batter evenly between the prepared cupcake liners. Bake for about 18-20 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Let cool in the pan for 5-10 minutes; then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.
  4. To make the frosting, combine the egg whites, sugar and cream of tartar in the top of a double boiler. Heat the mixture, whisking frequently, until it reaches 160 degrees with an instant-read thermometer. Transfer the mixture to the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Whisk starting at low speed and gradually increasing to medium-high speed until stiff, glossy peaks form. Mix in the vanilla until combined. Frost cooled cupcakes as desired.
  5. For a fun extra touch, you can use a kitchen torch and garnish with a sprinkle of brown sugar, if desired.

Mac and Cheese surprise

All kids love macaroni and cheese. Well, not just kids… let’s be honest. Cheese and noodle casseroles started appearing in medieval cookbooks – so yeah, you’re not alone in a love for this wonderful dish. Even Thomas Jefferson was a fan, serving “macaroni pie” at a state dinner in 1802. The recipe by today’s moniker appeared in 1824.

But it doesn’t need to be a completely unhealthy meal. With this Food and Wine recipe there’s some good news: mixing carrot puree with the cheddar cheese creates a wonderful source of vitamin A while reducing the amount of fat in the recipe. And, it’s still tasty.

 

Ingredients

3/4 pound carrots, peeled and thinly sliced
Zest and juice of 1 navel orange, zest removed in strips with a vegetable peeler
Salt
3 cups penne rigate (9 ounces)
3 ounces sharp cheddar cheese, shredded (1 1/2 cups)
1 Tbsp. chopped tarragon
Freshly ground white pepper

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a medium saucepan, combine the carrots with the zest and juice and 1/4 cup of water. Season with salt and bring to a boil. Cover and simmer over moderate heat until the carrots are very soft, about 30 minutes. Discard the zest. Transfer the carrots and any liquid to a blender and puree until very smooth.
  2. Meanwhile, in a large saucepan of boiling salted water, cook the pasta until al dente. Drain the pasta, reserving 1 cup of the cooking water.
  3. Return the pasta to the pot. Add the reserved water and the carrot puree and cook over moderate heat, stirring frequently, until the pasta is coated with a thickened sauce, about 5 minutes. Stir in three-fourths of the cheese and cook, stirring, until very creamy, 2 to 3 minutes longer. Stir in the tarragon and season with salt and white pepper.
  4. Transfer the pasta to a medium baking dish and top with the remaining cheese. Bake until the cheese is melted and lightly browned, about 20 minutes. Let stand for 5 minutes before serving.

Coffee Cup Cake

Have you been using your mugs for coffee, tea and hot cocoa? Boring!

In five minutes that cup could be holding delicious, super hot coffee cake. This could be a fun weekend morning treat to make with your kids. Even better, there’s no fighting. Everyone can make their own and personalize it. Do you love cinnamon? Add in some extra. Top it off with some fresh berries from the local farmers market.

Making a five-minute breakfast cake in a cup has been extra popular on Pinterest lately. We’re using a recipe is by the lovely ladies at PrudentBaby.com. It’s also great because it allows you to start your morning with a classic without facing days of leftovers.

Ingredients

Cake
1 Tbsp. butter
2 Tbsp. sugar
1 egg
2 Tbsp. sour cream
Vanilla
¼ cup flour
1/8 tsp. baking powder

Crumb topping
1 Tbsp. butter
2 Tbsp. flour
1 Tbsp. brown sugar
1 tsp. cinnamon 

Instructions

  1. Start with a coffee mug. Using a small one will result in a cake that puffs over. A taller one will allow you to really dig in. Whatever you prefer – or have lying around the house – make it happen.
  2. Add a tablespoon of butter. Then soften, don’t melt, it in the microwave. This should take 5 to 10 seconds.
  3. Stir in 2 tablespoons of sugar until it’s fluffy and creamy. Then you can add egg if you’d like. Without egg, the cake will by more crumbly. You can add a whole egg or break the egg into a ramekin, stir it up and split it between two cups of coffee cups.
  4. Stir in 2 tablespoons of sour cream and a few drops of vanilla. Be sparing with the vanilla.
  5. Stir in ¼ cup of flour and 1/8 teaspoon of baking powder.
  6. If you want crumb topping – which, let’s face it, is the best part so of course you do! – use a separate bowl or ramekin and put in 1 tablespoon of butter, 2 tablespoons of flour, 1 tablespoon of brown sugar and 1 teaspoon cinnamon. Then, using your finger, mix it all together.
  7. Since you’re coffee mug cake mix is finished, top it off with your new crumbly mix. Then, start it in the microwave for 1 minute. Then, do it for 10 second increments until the cake is cooked to your liking.
  8. Then, enjoy! It will be really, really hot! So be careful. Little hands may need to put something like a towel around the coffee cup at first.

Orange Smiles with a Jelly Twist

Most children have stuck an orange slice in their mouth and smiled. The peel making a comical smile is a childhood favorite. And, since slices of citrus will always be a healthy snack, this tradition will continue. In the spirit of April Fool’s Day this weekend, let’s add a twist to this favorite with blood orange jelly smiles. This can be made with any kind of citrus – like tangerines or navel oranges. Choose whichever your kids will try. But the blood oranges offer the most dramatic look. Consider serving these side-by-side with real slices of blood oranges. See if anyone can tell the difference!

 

Ingredients

6 blood oranges
1 packet of plain gelatin
Sugar or honey (optional to taste)  

Instructions

  1. Buy a sack of blood oranges.
  2. Get some plain gelatin. (You can find this in the baking aisle near the regular Jell-O.)
  3. Cut 6 oranges in half. (You can always multiply this recipe to make more.)
  4. Squeeze out the juice. Here’s where this project can be a little tricky. You want to squeeze out as much juice as possible without damaging the orange peel. Consider using a traditional manual juicer. Go slowly and twist each half so it’s as clean as possible.
  5. Scrape out any extra strings or flesh. Again, you want the peel intact, so if you can’t get everything out, it’s OK. A little extra orange flesh won’t mess this up.
  6. Put each orange peel shell into a muffin tin to hold them steady when you pour in the gelatin.
  7. Soften the gelatin. Measure 1/4 cup cold water in a glass measuring cup. Sprinkle 1 packet of plain gelatin into the water and let it sit.
  8. Heat the orange juice to boiling. Measure out about 3/4 cup of the juice. Also, this is where you can add a little sugar or honey, if you want to sweeten the juice. Taste and sweeten as needed. Bring the juice to a boil.
  9. Mix gelatin and juice. Take the boiling juice off the heat and whisk in the gelatin. Pour the juice and gelatin mixture back into the glass measuring cup.
  10. Fill orange peel shells. Fill each orange peel cup with the gelatin mixture, and put the muffin tins into the fridge to cool. The orange jelly will need 2-3 hours to set completely.
  11. Trim, slice, and serve! The filling should firm up and be quite stiff. Once it is hard enough, slice into wedges.

Super Strawberry Muffins

Being healthy is most attractive when it’s super tasty – right?

Bright red, juicy strawberries are the first sign of the spring and summer produce that will soon be filling farmers markets on hot evenings. California produces 1.8 billion pounds of strawberries a year, that’s 35,696 acres. This week we celebrated the fruit that offers antioxidants and boosts immunity with California Strawberry Day! For this weekend, we’re making strawberry muffins.

You can substitute strawberries for another berry – raspberries or blueberries for example – if you’re not a fan of, or are allergic to, the red berry.

What strawberry recipes do you love?

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Ingredients
2 1/2 cup oats (old-fashioned kind, not quick)
1 cup plain low-fat Greek yogurt
2 eggs
3/4 cup sweetener of choice, (that measures the same as sugar), or 1/2 cup if you prefer muffins to be less sweet
1 1/2 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1 1/2 cup strawberries, diced, and patted dry

Optional ingredients
1/2 cup of strawberries diced (to be placed on top of the muffins)
1 tsp. lemon juice

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line 12 muffin tins with silicone or foil liners, (or just use a silicone muffin pan). Using a flour-less recipe means the muffins will stick to paper liners.
  2. Place all of the ingredients (except the strawberries) in a blender or food processor, and blend until oats are smooth. Pour mixture into a medium-sized bowl, and stir in strawberries.
  3. Divide remaining 1/2 cup diced strawberries over the top of each muffin. (This step is optional, but it really makes the strawberries burst with color and flavor on top of each muffin!)
  4. Divide batter among cupcake liners, and bake for 20-25 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean.

Mixing together to support kid chefs

Some kids are picky eaters while others are fearless.

Willing to pick up that strange looking dish and give it a try, foodie youths need a place to explore their love. Recently, Kids Culinary Adventures joined forces with children’s foodie network ZisBoomBah.com. Together we’re creating an online space for cooking students with games that make cooking exciting and healthy recipes to try at home.

“Kids Culinary Adventures loves how much information on cooking and playing with food is on ZisBoomBah. And the best part is that ZisBoomBah reaches so many people and we think that’s pretty cool,” said Chef Gigi, founder of Kids Culinary Adventures.

Working together has created a top-notch, kid-friendly online resource for young chefs available 24/7.

“We are very excited to be bringing the ZisBoomBah experience into the kitchens of kid cooking schools across the country.  With this generation growing up with less healthy food it is critical to teach cooking skills to our kids.  Being creative in the kitchen will empower them to make better food choices throughout their life.” says ZisBoomBah Founder Karen Laszlo.

Let’s get a taste of what you can find online by cooking Hawaiian Waffles with tropical salsa. This is two recipes, but they work really well together.

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Hawaiian Waffles

Ingredients
2 Eggs
1/2 cup Butter, Unsalted
1 3/4 cup Milk
1 tablespoon Sugar
4 teaspoon Baking Powder
1/4 teaspoon Salt
1/2 cup Coconut Flakes

Preparation

  1. Preheat the waffle iron and spray lightly with non-stick cooking spray.
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk eggs until foamy.
  3. Whisk in melted butter and milk.
  4. Add flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt and whisk until just smooth.
  5. Fold in coconut.
  6. Pour batter onto hot waffle iron.
  7. Close lid and bake until steam stops and waffle is lightly browned and crisp, 3-4 minutes.
  8. Remove waffle and repeat with remaining batter. Serve with Tropical Fruit Salsa.

Tropical Salsa

Ingredients
1 mango Mango
1 cup Pineapple
1/4 pepper Jalapeno
2 stalk Onion, Green
1 pepper Bell Pepper
1/3 cup Parsley
2 teaspoon Red Wine Vinegar
1/4 teaspoon Salt
2 tablespoon Lime Juice, Fresh

Preparation

  1. Dice mango, pineapple, red bell pepper.
  2. Finely chop seeded jalapeno chile, green onions.
  3. Mince Parsley.
  4. Combine all ingredients in a bowl. Serve at room temperature.

10 Tried and True Suggestions to Make Cooking with Kids Fun…. (For Everyone!)

The kitchen is a terrific place to bond with children. Whether you’re planning to rustle up breakfast, or decorating cookies, you can create memories that will last a lifetime. Here are 10 super suggestions for making cooking with the kids fun for everyone!

Safety First– Kids need to understand the importance of safety. Teach young children to stay away from the hot stove, sharp knives, and other kitchen dangers. Every child loves to pour the milk and add the flour, so take a couple extra seconds to turn off the mixer and let them! Even better, do the mixing by hand when you can! That leads right into….

Cootie Protection– Good hygiene is an essential kitchen lesson to teach your kids. Make sure they understand the importance of washing their hands often, sneezing away from food, and to use clean dish cloths and cutting surfaces to avoid cross contamination. If you do it they will too!

The Simpler the Better– Kids love to dig in with both hands. Choose recipes that are easy, hand formed cookies are a fun start that keeps them involved.

Dont Watch the Clock– If the recipe says it takes 20 minutes to prepare count on 40 with kids in the kitchen. Plan accordingly and keep it fun. You and your child will have a much more enjoyable experience if you are not in a hurry, and the extra time is well spent when you consider those priceless memories and life skills!

Relax and have fun– There WILL BE funny shaped cakes, maybe a few egg shells in the batter. Take it all to heart and give praise often, even if it’s not perfect. This is a great time to share your own memories or even a baking secret. Shhhhhh!

Its Not Just About Cooking – The kitchen makes a fantastic classroom for kids. Learning to read and follow written directions is a very important lesson. Take advantage of showing them how fractions work in a recipe, how many minutes are in an hour when baking a cake, or the science in making a souffle rise, the educational opportunities are endless.

How to Answer Why? We all know thats a childs favorite question. Even if they don’t ask it you can provide all kinds of useful information. Explain why you need yeast in the bread, how baking soda works in cakes and cookies, and the differences between similar items like granulated sugar and confectioners sugar. Give them an opportunity to see, touch, and smell all the ingredients you are using in the recipe.

Food Safety – It’s important to teach kids how to care for food. Make kids aware of the bacteria that can live in food if not treated properly. Remind them that hot food should be kept hot (over 140 F) and cold food cold (under 40 F).

It’s OK to Use a Mix- The attention span of small children can be short to say the least. Using a mix can take less time, leave less room for error, and create less of a mess. Yes, this is one of those times where less can be more! Keep mixes handy for when time is of the essence. So what if its not made from scratch it was still time well spent!

Clean Up – Teach children that cleaning up is all part of the process. Do it as you go to keep a safe and sanitary cooking area. Remind them that no good chef leaves the kitchen until its clean.

Snacking on hot dogs, pretzels

Hot dogs are synonymous with so many traditional “American” activities like baseball or barbecues and Fourth of July.

While getting together with friends to enjoy a San Jose Sharks game or root on the World Champion San Francisco Giants from home, it only seems natural that hot dogs would be part of the celebration. Without planning, you’ll be in the kitchen or watching the grill rather than enjoying the game with your friends and family. That’s where pretzel hotdog bites come in.

Many stories come forward when trying to find the origins of the salty bread treat known as a pretzel.
According to The History of Science and Technology, by Bryan Bunch and Alexander Hellemans, in 610 AD “…an Italian monk invents pretzels as a reward to children who learn their prayers.” Called little rewards, or pretiola, there is no one source to back up this story. Others believe they came from a monastery in Southern France. A Greek ring bread could have been the inspiration for pretzel’s looped design. Regardless of where it started, everyone can agree that the bread is a delicious treat often enjoyed with mustard – just like the hotdog with which we’ll be pairing it.
Maybe you should offer a variety of mustards from spicy to honey and traditional. Remember, you can use any kind of pre-cooked sausage instead of the hotdog. Some of the prep work takes time. So plan accordingly. This recipe makes a lot! You can cut it in half, or freeze extras so you’re prepared for next time. If you have leftover dough, use it to make pretzels. Try sprinkling them with cinnamon and sugar for a sweet treat.

Ingredients:
Dough:
1 1/2 cups warm water
1 package active dry yeast
1 Tbs. sugar
1 tsp. salt
2 eggs
2 ounces unsalted butter, melted
5 cups all-purpose flour + more for dusting

Pickled mustard seeds:
1 cup cider vinegar
2 Tbs. sugar
1 Tbs. salt
1/3 cup whole yellow mustard seeds

To finish:
Vegetable oil spray
6 hot dogs or sausages – whatever you prefer
8 cups water
3/4 cup baking soda
Coarse or pretzel salt

Directions:
For the dough:
1. Combine water and yeast in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a dough hook and whisk until yeast is dissolved and starts to bubble, about 5 minutes. Add sugar, salt, 1 egg, butter and 1 cup of flour, and whisk together. Turn machine on low and add remaining flour in batches, waiting until each batch is combined. Stop every now and then to scrape down the sides of the bowl and clean off the hook.
2. Once you’ve incorporated all of the flour and the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl, transfer the dough ball to an oiled bowl, flip to oil the dough on all sides, cover with a kitchen towel, and let rise for 45 minutes in a warm place – your kitchen counter should be fine – until it doubles in size.

For the mustard seeds:
1. Bring the vinegar, sugar and salt to a boil in a small saucepan, stir to dissolve, then remove from heat and stir in the mustard seeds. Transfer to a bowl or container and refrigerate, covered, at least an hour, or up to two days.

To assemble:
1. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper, spray with non-stick spray and dust with flour – this is important, or else the dough will stick; set aside. Cut hot dogs in half lengthwise, and then cut each half in four pieces, so that you have eight pieces per hot dog; set aside.
2. Divide the dough in half, and on a floured surface, roll out each half into a 1/2-inch thick square, then slice into 2-inch strips. Take one strip and evenly space hot dog pieces about 1/2 inch apart on top, add a few pickled mustard seeds, then top with another dough strip. Using a pastry cutter or knife, slice through the top and bottom layer of dough around each hot dog piece, to make a little packet. Pinch the sides of each together if necessary to make sure there are no holes. Repeat with remaining dough and hot dogs. (The bites can be prepared up to this point and frozen for up to three weeks.)
3. Bring the eight cups water and baking soda to a boil in a medium saucepan. Add a few pretzel bites and boil for about 30 seconds; remove with a slotted spoon and transfer to the baking sheet. (The baking soda in the water helps keep the dough lighter.) Repeat with the remaining bites.
4. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Beat the remaining egg with a few splashes of water, and brush over the tops of the bites; sprinkle with salt. Bake 10-15 minutes, or until golden brown. Serve immediately.